Resources- USA - Wildlife

  • The first in an ongoing series we’re offering on important minerals for your livestock.  This week, Calcium!

    Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the feeds that livestock normally consume.  Because of this, it is one of the hardest …

  • Multiple-species grazing has been proven over the years to increase carrying capacity and benefit the range environment, if done correctly. Each type of ruminant we manage, cattle, sheep, goats, and deer all use a unique combination of the different …

  • Probably the most overlooked, but most frequently used mineral for our livestock is salt, chemically known an sodium chloride.  Everyone knows that livestock need salt, but how much do they need, and how do you use this requirement to your advantage? …

  • Potassium is probably the Rodney Dangerfield of the minerals in ruminant nutrition.  It doesn’t get any respect, or attention.  However, it is an extremely important nutrient that is involved in maintaining the acid-base relationship in the body, …

  • When you look at nutrition as a whole, it is really hard to say that one nutrient is more important than others.  Without energy, the body and the microorganisms would not have the fuel to function.  Without minerals, the chemical reactions that …

  • I use the term “effective rainfall” because not all of the moisture that hits the ground is usable to the plants.  Much of the rainfall that you get each year never finds its way into the soil to be used by the plants.  And much that does reach the …

  • Just what is ruminal protein? 

    Basically, it’s the protein produced by the microorganisms in the rumen.  They take the nitrogen and amino acids that are available to them in the rumen and use it to reproduce themselves.  As some of these …

  • Have you noticed the number of deer on the highway lately?  Deer grazing on the highway right of way is a sure sign of poor nutrition in the pasture.  Deer don’t like interaction with people, or their vehicles.  So when you see them out on the …

  • Nearly every day, I have a conversation with someone, either in person or over the phone, about feeding deer in hopes of improving the “quality” of their deer.  “Quality” in this case generally refers to an increase in body size and antler growth.   …

  • There is a lot of discussion going on about the ethics of high fencing of deer ranges.  Many traditional ranchers view the phenomena of high fencing as blights on the land as large ranches get broken up into smaller acreage.  And from a purely …

  • Many of you that are serious about the wildlife part of your operation are looking for ways to improve the quality of your deer.  Quality is generally defined as larger body size and increased antler scores.  For any particular age group, these …

  • Feeding deer is becoming a very popular function for many landowners whether for the pleasure of seeing the deer come to a feeder, or to improve their productivity in fawn production or antler growth.  Knowing that deer need supplemental protein in …

  • The principle of limiting factors is that performance will be constrained by the required factor that is present in the least amount.  One good analogy is a old wooden barrel with staves of different height.  The barrel can hold only as much water …

  • As fawning is coming to a close, it’s a good time to begin thinking about the population control measures you need to consider this year.  I’m sure that many of you will say, “I hunt – that’s my population control.”  And you’re right.

    However, when …

  • Whether deer need mineral supplements or not depends on what you want the deer to do.  If you are just looking for maintenance of the deer population, then they may not need mineral supplements.  However, if you are looking for improved performance, …

  • With the approach of hunting season, many hunters, and deer managers, will change their feeding program from free-choice feeding of protein pellets to timed release of deer corn in order to begin to pattern the deer to make hunting easier.  For most …

  • One of the more overlooked minerals in ruminant nutrition is sulfur.  A key ingredient in formation of some amino acids, formation of collagen, hormones, vitamins, and oxygen carriers, sulfur makes up around 0.25% of an animal’s bodyweight. 

    As …